9 mummies in newly discovered Ancient Nubian tomb
One of the coffins discovered - Photo courtesy of the Ministry of Antiquities official Facebook page
By THE CAIRO POST

CAIRO: Spanish archaeologists discovered a new tomb in South Aswan, believed to date back to the era known as the Late Period in Ancient Egyptian history, circa 664-332 B.C., Minister of Antiquities Mohamed Ibrahim announced Sunday.

The tomb contains nine coffins with mummies believed to be of former Nubian leaders. The tomb itself belonged to two ruling families in Aswan during the Middle Kingdom of Pharaonic Egypt, according to previous research conducted by the Spanish mission in Tomb 33.

Ibrahim explained that the tomb was re-used in later years, between 650-525 B.C. An additional wooden coffin was found and the mummy inside is believed to have been a person who lived during the Late Period.

A Nubian dagger was discovered with the mummy in linen wrappings, the minister added.

The discovery was made in the area of Koba el-Hawa, where there are several tombs for the rulers of Aswan during the Middle Kingdom of Egypt in the period between 2000-1700 B.C.

The area of the newly discovered tomb, which includes other tombs for some governors in Upper Egypt during the Middle and Old Kingdom of Egypt, was called Ta Si and its capital was the island of Abu, known in Greek as Elephantine.

This area includes a number of exceptional tombs, such as the tomb of King Horekhof also known as the only ruler that documented his autobiography, works, and voyages on the walls of his tomb. There is also the tomb of King Hakanb I whose temple was discovered by Egyptian archaeologist Labib Habashi behind the Museum of Aswan in the beginning of the 20th century.

Meanwhile, the head of the Spanish archaeologist team, Alejandro Jimmenez, said they finished the documentation of the discovery of King Kaqa Abe III’s mummy, previously found during earlier visits to Egypt.

 

One of the coffins discovered - Photo courtesy of the Ministry of Antiquities official Facebook page

One of the coffins discovered – Photo courtesy of the Ministry of Antiquities official Facebook page

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