Egypt develops hi-tech security system in museums, archeology sites
Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh el-Damaty - YOUM7 (Archive)
By RANY MOSTAFA

CAIRO: Modern technological innovations and hi-tech security systems will be developed in Egypt’s archaeological sites and museums to curb the loss and looting of ancient treasures, Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh el-Damaty said in a press conference Sunday.

The new security system is in the framework of the ministry’s comprehensive plan to fill security gaps and revamp security measures at archaeological sites and museums across Egypt, Damaty said. The plan will be initially applied in Luxor Temple, the Valley of the Kings, and the Giza Pyramids and will pervade through archaeological sites across Egypt by 2015.

“The new security applications, which are mainly based on thermal imaging, will include but not be limited to positioned cameras at entrances and exits of a site, mounted cameras to provide full views of all rooms at each museum, infrared fence beams to surround archaeological sites, and burglar alarms connected to TV circuits,” Damaty said.

The security accessories will be imported from Spain and will be installed by Egyptian technicians in cooperation with the Spanish government, chief of Antiquities Ministry’s Projects Sector Lieutenant General Mohamed Al-Sheikha told The Cairo Post.

“Monitoring activities in a museum or an archaeological site, where valuable collections are on display, will deter acts of vandalism and will enable workers to spot potential threats,” Sheikha said.

Several archaeological sites and museums have been looted in the wake of the January 25 Revolution in 2011.

Egypt recovered 1,250 artifacts of thousands that have been stolen from several museums and archaeological sites, former Minister of Antiquities Mohamed Ibrahim was quoted as saying by The Cairo Post in February.

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Comments

  1. Lawrence Rothfield
    September 5, 2014 at 9:24 pm

    Welcome news. But why doesn’t Egypt join forces with a number of other countries and approach MIT, Google, and other tech innovators to create next-generation monitoring?

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