Doctor and nurses imprisoned for fatal malpractice
Supreme Court of Justice In Egypt - YOUM7 (Archive)
By AMIRA EL-FEKKI

CAIRO: The Dar El-Salam Court of Misdemeanors sentenced Monday a doctor to five years in prison and two nurses to three years for the ‘accidental’ killing of 26-year-old journalist Heba al-Ayouti on June 9 after she received an incorrect injection at the Nile Badrawy Hospital in Cairo’s Maadi neighborhood.

Doctor Mohamed Salah Abdul Hamid el-Sayed and nurses Doaa Nabil Abdel Megeed and Nahed Hassan Ali are to serve their prison terms with hard labor, Youm7 reported Monday.

“We are yet to accept condolences for her death, we will continue the legal pursuit of all the parties involved; the hospital is responsible for deleting records of her admission, as well as the director who then testified she was not injected with the chemical substance,” the victim’s brother, Amr al-Ayouti, told CBC channel Monday, commenting on the verdict.

The attorney general’s report released in May said Ayouti was given a formaldehyde solution to which her body had a negative reaction causing very low blood pressure and bloating in the stomach which led to renal and lung failure.

The sentence followed a ruling by the Forensic Medicine Authority in July that the doctors’ negligence was the cause of Ayouti’s death while she was undergoing a scan on her ovaries. The doctor and nurses then allegedly conspired not tell the family.

“The situation has become unbearable,” Ayouti’s brother said on Mehwer channel. “Every week we read about the death of young people because of medical negligence and this is why we will not give up on our cause against all of those criminal doctors.”

However, the criminal conviction of the doctor does not necessarily mean he loses his Medical Syndicate membership, a member told The Cairo Post over the phone, adding that he had not heard of any updates concerning the doctor involved in Ayouti’s case.

Explaining what the syndicate’s procedures would be, the member said the syndicate must receive a complaint and investigate it through its own disciplinary council. According to the head of the investigations committee Rashwan Shabaan’s statement on CBC on Nov. 15, the syndicate can only start moving upon a filed complaint, but does not interfere legally otherwise.

Additional reporting by Mohamed Ibrahim.

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