Photo exhibition of Queen Nefertari’s tomb inaugurated in the Egyptian museum
Visitors walk in front of the Temple of Queen Nefertari, wife of Egyptian Pharaoh Ramses II - REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
By RANY MOSTAFA

CAIRO: An exhibition dubbed “Queen Nefertari 1904- 2014” was inaugurated at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, according to a statement on the ministry’s Facebook page Wednesday.

The exhibition, coinciding with the 110th anniversary of the discovery of the Queen’s tomb in the west bank of Luxor, “showcases a unique collection of black and white photos demonstrating the phases of tomb’s discovery along with photos of the tomb after and before restoration,” according to the statement.

The inauguration was made by Antiquities Minister Mamdouh el-Damaty and Italian ambassador to Cairo Mauricio Massari.

“The exhibit aims to highlight the efforts of the joint mission, established in 1998 and comprised of archaeologists from the Italy-based Getty Conservation Institute and the Antiquities Ministry, to conserve the wall paintings in the tomb of Nefertari,” said Damaty.

Cut into the limestone to a depth of about 12 meters at the Valley of the Queens in Luxor’s west bank, the tomb of Nefertari has been suffering from rainwater that has leaked into the tomb over thousands of years along with salt deposits that ruined most of the plaster layers and the paintings on its walls, archaeologist Sherif el-Sabban told The Cairo Post Thursday.

“The surfaces of the tomb were first leveled with a clay render, plaster was then applied and this was carved and repainted,” said Sabban.

The tomb, 520 square meters big, consists of seven architectural spaces disposed on two principal levels: an entrance with a vestibule leading to an inner chamber at the upper level, and the burial chamber with side rooms at the lower level, according to Sabban.

The tomb is famous for its intricate paintings and funerary scenes. It was cut during the reign of Ramses II (1279B.C.–1213B.C.) and was dedicated to his wife Queen Nefertari.

The tomb was discovered in 1904 by Italian archaeologist Ernesto Schiaparelli (1856-1928), who was the director of the Egyptian Museum in Turin.

Recommend to friends

Leave a comment