Tomb of Tutankhamen’s viceroy in Luxor opens after renovation completed
Offering scenes inside one the 3 newly discovered tombs. The antiquities ministry facebook page

CAIRO: Three tombs, belong to ancient Egyptian high official during the New Kingdom Period (1580 B.C.-1080 B.C.) were opened for public Thursday for the first time since excavation, the antiquities ministry stated.

The newly opened tombs are located at the Qurnat Mar‘I archaeological site; part of the Theban Necropolis on west bank of Luxor. “It was used as a cemetery for officials of the New Kingdom administration in Thebes. During the Islamic era, the site was named after a Muslim Sheikh strongly believed to have been buried on the summit of the site,” archaeologist Sherif el Sabban told The Cairo Post Friday.

One of the three tombs belonged to “Imn hotep – Huy” who held the title of “Viceroy of Egypt and the Governor of the Southern Lands” during the reign of Pharaoh Tutankhamen, according to the statement.

The tomb is well preserved with scenes showing Huy being greeted by Khay, the High Priest of King Tut, said Damaty.

The second tomb belonged to Amenemonet who held the title of “the Divine Father of the temple of Pharoah Amenhotep III,” Damaty said.

“Although incomplete and small, the tomb is very well preserved. It was discovered in 1917 and contains offering scenes representing Amenemonet, whose name means “Amon of the Valley,” making offerings to several ancient Egyptian deities including Ptah-Sokar,” Damaty said.

The last tomb belonged to Amenemhab who held the title of “the Herdsman of God Amun Re during the New Kingdom Period,” Damaty said, adding that the opening of the new tombs comes in the framework of the ministry’s strategy to encourage tourism.

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