One killed in blast at Istanbul airport, cause unknown: local media
The Pegasus Airlines plane from the Ukrainian city of Kharkov is pictured on the tarmac of Istanbul's Sabiha Gokcen airport in this February 7, 2014 handout photo from Ihlas News Agency. Turkish special forces seized a suspect who made a bomb threat and tried to hijack a passenger plane demanding to go to the Winter Olympics venue of Sochi, CNN Turk and other Turkish media said on Friday. They said the suspect was taken away for questioning after the Pegasus Airlines plane from the Ukrainian city of Kharkov arrived in Istanbul's Sabiha Gokcen airport. REUTERS/Ihlas News Agency/Handout via Reuters (TURKEY - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW TRANSPORT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. NO SALES. NO ARCHIVES. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
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ISTANBUL: An explosion at Istanbul’s second-largest airport on Wednesday killed one cleaner on an airplane and injured another, Dogan news agency said, adding authorities were investigating whether the blast was caused by a bomb.

Budget carrier Pegasus said the explosion at Sabiha Gokcen airport on the Asian side of the city occurred at 2:05 a.m. (7.05 p.m. ET Tuesday), when no passengers were in the area. It said its operations at the airport were continuing normally.

Police armed with rifles and protective vests imposed tight security at entrances to the airport after the blast, searching vehicles while a police helicopter circled overhead, state-run Anadolu Agency said.

Anadolu earlier reported that one of the cleaners suffered a head wound, while the other was wounded in the hand. Both were women.

Police declined comment on the incident.

The airport said investigations into the cause of the blast were ongoing, and that air traffic was operating normally.

Bomb attacks by Kurdish, leftist and Islamist militants are common in Turkey. A three-decades-old conflict between the state and the militant Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) has flared up in Turkey’s mainly Kurdish southeast since the collapse of a ceasefire in July.

According to its website, the airport served around 26 million passengers in the first 11 months of the year, less than half the number at the main Ataturk airport on the European side of the city.

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