Alabama Marks 50th Anniversary Of Racial Bombing That Left Legacy Of Change
United States Attorney General Eric Holder, and former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice at the ceremony in Alabama
Reuters, Birmingham

Fifty years after a bomb ripped through a Sunday school, killing four girls and rocking a racially divided nation, the city of Birmingham, Alabama, is commemorating the tragedy that led to the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

“It is a sad story, but there is a joy that came out of it,” said Sarah Collins Rudolph, who survived the blast at the 16th Street Baptist Church. Her 14-year-old sister, Addie Mae Collins, was among the victims of the bomb planted by a member of the Ku Klux Klan.

Rudolph lost an eye and was partially blinded in her remaining eye when the bomb went off, while she and four other girls were in a church restroom.

“I will never forget walking over their dead bodies,” she told Reuters.

On Sunday, at 10:22 a.m. CT (1522 GMT), the time of the blast, the church’s bell tolled in remembrance of Collins, 11-year-old Denise McNair, and Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley, both 14.

U.S Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Civil rights activist Reverend Jesse Jackson and Former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice were attended the ceremony.

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