January 25 Revolution
January 25 Revolution wrote on Egypt's flag at Tahrir square - YOUM7 (Archive)

Arabic: ثورة ٢٥ يناير

Egypt’s 2011 revolution, popularly known as the January 25 Revolution or just 25 January, began on January 25, 2011 and toppled 30-year president Hosni Mubarak from power after 18 days. The revolution began as a popular uprising and, two years later, is considered by many to be ongoing.

The major demands of the revolution were the removal of Mubarak and other corrupt government officials, preventing Mubarak’s son Gamal from inheriting the presidency, dissolving the parliament, rewriting the constitution, and implementing “real” democracy.

Labor strikes and wage demands came mostly after the fall of Mubarak.

While media coverage of the revolution largely centered on Cairo and its now-iconic Tahrir Square and the port cities of Alexandria and Suez, demonstrations took place across the country.

The Egyptian revolution was widely considered to be a secular popular uprising. Religious groups were present but not overly so, and there was no one leader or organizer of the demonstrations.

The demonstrations were also mostly peaceful on the part of the demonstrators. They consisted of protests, marches, sit-ins, civil disobedience, and labor strikes.

Over 800 people were killed during the revolution and thousands were injured. During the early days of the revolution, a curfew was imposed for up to 17 hours per day. In late February the curfew was reduced, and against in March, and finally on June 15 it ended completely.

The major causes of the revolution are considered to be the perceived likelihood of Gamal Mubarak’s inheritance of the presidency; the most overtly fraudulent parliamentary elections in recent history in November 2010; the murder of a young man named Khaled Said at the hands of Egyptian police in June 2010; widespread governmental corruption and nepotism; continuance of the Emergency Law and police brutality; increasing restrictions on freedom and press; and increasing frustration with the lack outlets to express political and social opinions and desires.Egypt’s 2011 revolution, popularly known as the January 25 Revolution or just 25 January, began on January 25, 2011 and toppled 30-year president Hosni Mubarak from power after 18 days. The revolution began as a popular uprising and, two years later, is considered by many to be ongoing.

The major demands of the revolution were the removal of Mubarak and other corrupt government officials, preventing Mubarak’s son Gamal from inheriting the presidency, dissolving the parliament, rewriting the constitution, and implementing “real” democracy.

Labor strikes and wage demands came mostly after the fall of Mubarak.

While media coverage of the revolution largely centered on Cairo and its now-iconic Tahrir Square and the port cities of Alexandria and Suez, demonstrations took place across the country.

The Egyptian revolution was widely considered to be a secular popular uprising. Religious groups were present but not overly so, and there was no one leader or organizer of the demonstrations.

The demonstrations were also mostly peaceful on the part of the demonstrators. They consisted of protests, marches, sit-ins, civil disobedience, and labor strikes.

Over 800 people were killed during the revolution and thousands were injured. During the early days of the revolution, a curfew was imposed for up to 17 hours per day. In late February the curfew was reduced, and against in March, and finally on June 15 it ended completely.

The major causes of the revolution are considered to be the perceived likelihood of Gamal Mubarak’s inheritance of the presidency; the most overtly fraudulent parliamentary elections in recent history in November 2010; the murder of a young man named Khaled Said at the hands of Egyptian police in June 2010; widespread governmental corruption and nepotism; continuance of the Emergency Law and police brutality; increasing restrictions on freedom and press; and increasing frustration with the lack outlets to express political and social opinions and desires.

On Nov. 29, 2014, former Minister of Interior Habib al-Adly, and his six aides were acquitted of ordering the killing of protesters. The same charges against Mubarak were dropped by the presiding judge, who said in his explanation of the verdict that there were no sufficient legal grounds to charge the former president. Protests in Tahrir Square followed the night of the verdict, with at least two protesters killed, including a 14-year old, and the attorney general has announced that he would appeal the acquittals.

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